DJ OVERDOSE

DJ Overdose, the notorious DJ & producer from The Hague talks to Entropia, shares a mayhem Miami Bass mix from the past and is still looking for the perfect beat.

– While checking one of your pages we came across the phrase “Wearing a kangol, black shirt, gold chain and sneakers.” How did Hip Hop culture affect you and what did first draw you to turntables and DJing?

I just loved it from the fisrt time I heard it, one of the first things I remember was Melle Mell in Chaka Khan’s, I Feel For You. That rapping is to me timeless and it still sounds great. Hip Hop was very lucky to have Melle Mell right from the get go, some of his lyrics are still the best ever in Hip Hop to me. I mean “The Message” is a hard record to beat. All original music by real musicians with very vivid lyrics that are delivered funky as hell. I can’t really remember when I first saw someone scratching, probably in Herbie Hancock’s video for Rock It, I was always fascinated by the turntable as a kid and at that point somebody was using it to make a noise I never heard before. I just had to do that too!

Grandmaster Melle Mel, circa 1984​

– Do you remember the records you used for your very first set? Where did it take place?

The first time I played, I played all kinds of stuff, probably all the records I had cause I hadn’t been playing a long time. Pink Floyd, Duran Duran, Prince. It was in a small club in The Hague which I can’t remember the name of. I think it was one of the many squat places we had back then.

– Who is your favourite MC, DJ or crew and which era of the 80’s Hip Hop sound attracted you most?

Well I have lots of favorites but I used to be and still am a real Schoolly D fan, the rawness of his stuff is unmatched. Also his sparse rapping and the slang he used. I really love his first three records, there is also a real progression in the production, which is really cool to hear. From drumcomputer with reverb to the use of more and more samplers. The music got more intricate but the first one might still be the best one. Less is more.

Schooly D, circa 1988

– How did you transit from being a DJ to start producing your own music?

In Hip Hop they do a lot of name dropping of the equipment they use, and Hip Hop didn’t sound as if it was going to take a million hours of music lessons, so when I heard them drop SP12 in half the records I had, I wanted to have this machine and try it for myself. The SP12 was hard to find in The Netherlands though, so first I had a shitty drum machine and when I got it, I found out it was still pretty hard to make a beat that would be more than mediocre. A few years later I did find the SP12 and it was one of the best days of my life. So actually, I did put in those million hours of learning after all.

– What is your current gear set up? Is there any piece of equipment you desire to add ?

Lately I ‘ve been having the feeling I have too much stuff, I am actually thinking of slimming down, but at the same time, I like all the single pieces of gear I have.
I don’t have the desire to add anything but if I could get my hands on some classics I think I could not resist. Space Echo, TR808 (again).
I think i would be ok with just having the SP, the SQ80, and maybe my MicroMoog or the Arp Axxe. But I would never let my modded RZ1 go either.

– You recently did a remix on Cli-N-Tel’s “2030” for the german electro label Ground Control. What is the feeling of reworking a classic mid 80’s west coast jam?

I wanted to keep a lot from the original, so I just beefed it up with more kicks and edits and put a bit more of a tough edge on it. I also did one for “Jam On It”, it will be coming out soon hopefully from Neon Finger Records. I took the same approach with this one and I think it’s more of a remix that could have been done around the time the record came out.

– Last year you dropped a 12″ on Domianance Electricity’s sub-label Electro Empire with the main track being a homage to the Polish sci-fi film “Na srebrnym globie”. What is the story behind this record?

I really liked the movie plus the voice of the “Monster” is so cool. Also what he says.
So when I saw the movie and afterwards was making music, I just decided to use it in the track.

– Apart from your plentiful personal releases, you share projects and collaborate a lot with other people.
Which way is more fun to work? Does composing together with other artists make you want to experiment further?


I think experiment-wise I do it more when I do stuff alone. But of course, you do get a different combination of things working together with someone.
I did a whole record with Willie Burns last year, which is maybe not experimental, but just jamming. It’s cool, but it might be a bit too much simply jamming to be heard out there.
I think I ‘m going to put it on my bandcamp tonight hehehe.

– You travel around many countries performing, from small gigs to massive festivals, which was the sweetest highlight you can recall?

I really liked the American tours we did with the Novamen. DJing is mostly more in and out action with sometimes only a day to do some sightseeing and stuff, but touring is something else. DJ gig-wise, I had a lot of good ones, some great, some not so great, just like everybody else.

– Which is your favourite record store? Where do you buy records from?

I don’t buy a lot of new music but I do still want to complete my Miami Bass collection. I don’t want everything but I do want all these I find pretty good. There is no place to buy that here so i get it mostly from Discogs. I do still like to go to record stores if i have the time whenever I am somewhere abroad. In Holland i mostly buy stuff at flea markets or thrift stores.

– Which is the most “cheesy” record of your collection? How proud of it are you?

Pfoe, I don’t think I actually really like cheesy. I have a lot of guilty pleasures but not in a cheesy way. Or if you could call “Love Will Tear Us Apart” cheesy, I think it would be something like that or some New Romantics stuff like Duran Duran or something like that. Billy Idol!! Country music?!

– What’s next in plan for DJ Overdose, what motivates you in 2017?

I’m a man of habits so I guess the same thing as ever, Looking For The Perfect Beat.




Artist Pages: Soundcloud | Discography | Bookings

Vito Ricci :: A unique sonic cosmos



I am not sure if anyone can resist on Vito Ricci’s music. It’s love on the first sound, even if it is described as experimental or avant-garde, genres that often fill doubts the prospective listeners, fearing that it hides heavy academicism.

Started out his musical education with people like Ursula Mamlok, Eleanor Cory, Ornette Coleman and Joel Grossel. Quickly involved into the avant-garde scene with spoken word performances and film scores for independent movies. He even played in punk bands with performances at venues such as CBGB’s and Mudd Club. His musical journey led him to improvisation and experimental jazz, working alongside great musicians such as Byard Lancaster, Rashied Ali, Youssef Yancey, Peter Zummo, Bob Holman, Martin Goldray and others.

Vito Ricci produced only a handful of self-released cassettes and one LP between 1983 – 1985 with most of his work being recorded for experimental theatre and performance art pieces.

His instinct and creativity made him a vital and prolific composer of illuminating and compelling works

His instinct and creativity made him a vital and prolific composer of illuminating and compelling works. Infused with poignancy and honesty, his music has the power to linger in the listener’s memory. Ricci’s unique use of intricate percussion with a wide world of sonic influences created a sphere of hypnotizing ambient, meditative minimal synth, dubbed out electronic funk and even leftfield boogie.
An unsung hero of electronic and ambient music scene.


Hotline :: You Are Mine


Say what ever you want, but there’s no denying that West African funk can shake any dancefloor around the world. When you have the right record in your hands, it’s like a bomb ready to explode and spread the groove to everyone that can hear this magic boogie beat.

Hotline’s “You Are mine” it’s like that. An album recorded at Decca’s studio in Lagos, Nigeria in 1986 and released by the Decca sublabel Blackspot.
This is the only known recorded album by Hotline.

The band was miles ahead of its time. They had a very unique sound with heavy synth moog lines, groovy bass and rudimental mind thinking drums

The band was miles ahead of its time. They had a very unique sound with heavy synth moog lines, groovy bass and rudimental mind thinking drums.The whole atmosphere of their album it’s the thin line between reggae and boogie music, close to many tracks from this period of the Nigerian scene. But here we have to say it again, the sound is unique!

All tracks are killers and you can feel that from the very first moments in each song.
Heavy on the dancefloor, always in demand. Their insane boogie funk reggae tracks gonna explode your mind for real. This rare masterpiece is now double re-issued by the French label Jamwax and the British Soundway. Exclusive photos from Hotline’s personal collection are included.

Fella’s did it in Lagos!


KINK GONG :: A Primitive Spirit


Under the pseudonym Kink Gong, Laurent Janneau records and reconstucts ritual music mainly from South East Asia and Africa. The music catalogue of his wandering life is a collection of ethnic minority music. He had crossed countries such as: Cambodia,Vietnam, Tanzania, China, Thailand and Laos to record music from vanishing cultures. A nomad for long years who ends up in some villages of the deep forest to capture sounds. His recordings made to be felt, not analyzed, but recognized as a great source of emotions. He was there at the right time in the right place following his dream to record music and as we living in a time were politically correctness is the new world, he refuses any academic approach to his work.

“I find it quite stupid when people who don’t really care about the music, telling me: it’s so great what you’re doing, to preserve this culture! I don’t have any power to preserve any culture!”

“I find it quite stupid when people who don’t really care about the music, telling me: it’s so great what you’re doing, to preserve this culture! I don’t have any power to preserve any culture! It just happened to be there, to do recordings. But is not in the name of preservation, a more aural issue. I don’t believe in good intensions…it’s my own way to get a certain power out of my life. To be someone, who’s doing what he like to do, and that’s my main motivation. What I like to do, is to find this music that is consider as “primitive” and I accept the subjective primitive music. It’s something that really interests me. Because, in the primitive music, “primitive people” – says and shakes the index fingers of his hands -, have exactly the same emotions with you and me, that any kind of people can have access to it and get the pleasure of it.”

Apart of his self released albums, labels such as Discrepant and Akuphone publish in vinyl Jeanneau’s electronic deconstructions of his field recordings. Music you have probably never heard before.


Brother Resistance :: were soca and rap met


Born as Roy Lewis, became Rastafarian Lutalo Makossa Masimba, known in the Rapso arena as Brother Resistance. Grew up in East Dry River, area of Port of Spain, in Trinidad. He became in 1979, among with Brother Shortmanthe the lead singer of the Network Riddum Band. They developed a unigue hybrid of soca and rap, called rapso, a style for which they credited Lancelot Layne as the originator. Their 1981 debut album “Busting Out”, became a major hit defining the musical style that would come to be known as Rapso. It was the first this term used.

Rapso music is the poetry of calypso and the consciousness of soca and was formed out of the spoken word

Rapso music is the poetry of calypso and the consciousness of soca and was formed out of the spoken word. Since its creation it has been infused with soul and reggae music, originated in the 1970’s, and has its historical roots in the African tradition of Griots. It was created to express the concerns of the poor people and describe the everyday life in Trinidad . During the 70’s Trinidad and Tobago experienced much political and social unrest, afflicting the nation throughout 70’s and 80’s. But also it was the rise of the Black Power Movement.

Brother Resistance played a significant role in the Rapso movement, deploying his music to spread messages of hope and liberation. The authorities took Brother Resistance’s rising status seriously, destroying what they could of his studios and leave only a small amount of his music. His finest work remastered and repressed by Left Ear Records for first time…the music and the message is still on, by the voice of resistance!


Don – Bradshaw Leather :: Distance Between Us


“What the fuck is this?” This is usually the first thing that someone who sees this album says. It’s definitely a strange egg, one of the most bizarre records you ‘ll meet in your life. And if the front cover it’s not insane enough, with Don Bradshaw Leather dazzled with black makeup, proposing his hands, as if inviting you to a precipitation in a dark lunatic world where nothing is sure, then you will surely be convinced by the back cover and the rest photos.

Satanism? Sexism? Hippism? Japanese theater No or Kabuki? What else you want? The music is an aural hell, probably Lucifer’s favorite soundtrack

Satanism? Sexism? Hippism? Japanese theater No or Kabuki? What else you want? The music is an aural hell, probably Lucifer’s favorite soundtrack.The four tracks (each side a song or something like that), are dense, swirling and hellish tapestries of blurred instrumentation and squawking female voices deep buried. Each song is different mood, involving drums, percussions, piano, mellotron, lots of reverb and clever layering. Full experimental and avant-garde, almost Krautrock, but for sure unique. And as the time goes by, you realize that you had been involved in a ritual, you feel a little afraid and your mind begins to make strange thoughts. It’s true what I heard or a quote of my imagination?… And the distance goes on!

Abdou El Omari :: Morrocan Psychedelia


Abdou El Omari was born in 1945 in the small town of Tafraout, Morocco and passed away on March 3, 2010 in Casablanca. He is considered as an innovator of Moroccan music, he took traditional music (styles like gnawa, sufi, chaabi and classical malhun) and added a contemporary flavor combining funk, rock and progressive jazz.The result is a hyper oriental psych monster which entered in a mystical mood under the influence of forgotten chords.

The result is a hyper oriental psych monster which entered in a mystical mood under the influence of forgotten chords

As a musician, keyboardist, was member of several orchestras, including the Royal orchestra. He also served Casablanca’s famous band “Golden Hands”(Al Ayadi At Dahabiyya). Disques GAM published his first and only solo album in 1976, entitled “Nuits d’Ete”, including seven songs of pure innovating sound for the Moroccan music. The aural tapestry of the keyboards takes you real deep in the Moroccan tradition but at the same time gives a sense of west sound. He collaborate with many artists of the Moroccan musical heritage with the most famous being the one with singer Naima Samih.

All of his work remained for long time in the shadow. Belgian label Radio Martiko dug deep in his work and re-issued his LP “Nuits D’Ete” and also issued his previously unreleased works “Nuits D’Ete with Naima Samih” and “Nuits De Printemps”. Pure magic!

Digital Zandoli I & II :: Zouk – Synthesizers and Drum Machines in the West Indies


Let’s make it clear from the beginning, what does zouk mean?
The Creole word zouk , sekwe, or zouke from the French verb “secouer” meaning “shake intensely and repeatedly”. Skah Sha and Magnum band were among the first Haitian music groups to use the word souke/zouke in the French Antilles. The word zouk has, over time, come to mean “a place to dance” or “party, festival” in the local Antillean Creole. And really this is music for parties, to move your body, to dance. Back in the 80’s, zouk was the music style that you can hear everywhere in the French West Indies, especially in Martinique and Guadeloupe.

The traditional origins of zouk are bélé, cadence-lypso, biguine, gwo ka and other Afro-Caribbean music styles

The traditional origins of zouk are bélé, cadence-lypso, biguine, gwo ka and other Afro-Caribbean music styles.The sound was combined with funk, afrobeat, disco and Latin Brazilian with the addition of drum machines and synthesizers during the creative process. So, Zouk came into the light. Like a tropical storm followed by a bright sunny day on a forgotten exotic island. Sound is highly danceable, attractive and unique. Digital Zandoli I & II, compilation/project captured the climate, credit goes to specialists of the genre, Julien Achard and Nicolas Skliris. A tropical experience!